Creative Reverse Engineering: From remote sensuality to haptic metrology

Creative Reverse Engineering: From remote sensuality to haptic metrology

Authors: Naomi Dines, Dom Biddulph

Abstract:

Our on-going experimentation in close-range Photogrammetry has overcome common challenges to generate accurate, high-resolution 3D models using a single DSLR camera and innovative approaches and computer-coded devices. More recent investigations across disciplines sought to bridge the gap between traditional creative skills and modes of visualisation, and what can be made possible through digital means. Working as artists and designers alongside museums and historians, we have developed new photogrammetry equipment and approaches to help overcome the complex fluid geometry, shadowy occlusions and delicate lamina edges of challenging monochromatic garments. The resulting 3D models have allowed the rapid extraction of faithful seams and surfaces direct from the processed ‘mesh’ and into CAD modelling environments for the production of new designs, patterns and production tooling. Current collaborations seek to apply these developments to the capture, visualisation and reverse engineering of iconic garments and museum artefacts, alongside the ‘remote sensing’ of traditional pattern cutters whose eyes, minds and hands are the equivalent of the digital approaches explored in our paper. The second phase sought to unpick some of the familiar structures of object- and asset creation in and for Virtual and Augmented Reality. Experimenting with equipment, methods and processing techniques allowed us to explore the potential of 3D visualisations and readily available tools within Virtual and Augmented Reality for garment design and other forms of object-based creative ideation, sketching and prototyping. In the next stages of our on-going research we explored a more haptic form of CAD-enabled modelling and metrology, aiming to bring these approaches within the reach of a wider range of creative users: enabling artists, designers and makers to move more seamlessly between digital tools and virtual environments, and actual things in real time and space.

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